Prescription Opioid Misuse by the Unintended Often Comes From a Valid Prescription

Prescription Opioid Misuse by the Unintended
Often Comes From a Valid Prescription1*

of adults who misused prescription opioids
obtained them from a friend or relative

of adults who misused
prescription opioids obtained
them from a friend or relative

Of those who obtained prescription opioids for free from friends or relatives,

reported the friend or relative received
the opioids from a physician

reported the friend or relative
received the opioids from a
physician

*National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) is an annual survey of the noninstitutionalized civilian population of the United States aged 12 years or older and is conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Data are from the 2015 survey results.

Includes individuals who bought, stole, or obtained prescription opioids for free from a friend or relative.

Regardless of Route of Abuse at Initiation, Many Respondents Progressed to or Continued With Non-Oral Routes2‡

Researchers and Participants Interacting Directly (RAPID) Program consists of a subset of nationally representative treatment-seeking opioid users from the ongoing nationwide Survey of Key Informants' Patients (SKIP) Program, which collects and analyzes post-marketing data on the abuse and diversion of prescription opioid analgesics and heroin. Data were from people with a lifetime history of prescription opioid abuse.

§Among those who initiated with non-oral use, 3.6% switched over to oral use at a later time.

Morphine Is the Most Prescribed Extended-Release
Opioid and Is Widely Abused3-5

of morphine abuse involves tampering||
Survey included both ER and IR morphine

ER=extended release; IR=immediate release.

||Analysis of 233 respondents from the 2010 and 2011 US National Health and Wellness Survey who, in the previous 3 months, reported abuse of prescription opioid medication for the purpose of getting high. Abuse of morphine (morphine, Kadian®, Duramorph®) was reported by 18% of the surveyed population.

Prescription opioid abuse and route-of-administration data from 59,792 US patients in substance abuse treatment within the addiction severity index—multimedia version connect system were collected during the calendar year of 2009.

#Inhalation or injection as routes of abuse were not mutually exclusive within the experience of any individual abuser. Subjects could have reported more than 1 route of abuse.

Opioid Abuse Is a Complex Societal Problem With No Single Solution

Abuse-deterrent formulations are expected to play an important part in deterring abuse; however, they may still be abused

There is currently limited real-world evidence showing the impact of abuse-deterrent formulations on opioid abuse. This is partly due to confounding factors, including limited market share of abuse-deterrent formulations1

Page navigation - Why Abuse-Deterrent Formulation

Clinical Abuse Potential Study

When manipulated and taken intranasally, review the data of MORPHABOND ER vs MS Contin®

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